The Weighting Game

The Red Sox just never got it right last year. The defending champions stumbled out of the gate and limped to their second last-place finish in three seasons. So it’s no surprise, at least to me, that they responded with a vengeance in the offseason.

They traded for Wade Miley. They traded for Rick Porcello. They dumped struggling Will Middlebrooks and signed the best bat on the market, Hanley Ramirez, to a long-term deal to restart the offense. But the most risky, and at least in my opinion, the worst decision, was to sign Pablo Sandoval to big money to be a cornerstone at 3rd base.

Sandoval is the very definition of a clutch hitter, if such a thing exists. He’s a three-time World Series champion, owns a World Series MVP trophy, and has a career postseason batting average of .344. This guy comes up big when it matters most. We all know that.

But his focus and commitment have been questioned throughout his career. His regular season numbers are mediocre, he has huge lapses in concentration throughout the long season, and he’s had struggles with his weight his entire career. So it must have been pretty concerning when Pablo showed up to camp looking like he spent the entire winter at Burger King.

This has to be concerning to the Red Sox. I know some might say that Sandoval’s weight is no big deal, and that he’ll step up when it matters, like he always does. But the regular season is a long grind, and you have to get to the postseason before you can make an impact there.

You might say that his weight issues didn’t stop the Giants from winning three championships, but Boston is a very different team from San Francisco. The Giants were built on pitching and defense, and getting timely hits when it mattered. That’s the exact recipe of success for a player like Sandoval. The Red Sox, on the other hand, are going to have to have consistent offense all year round to win the AL East. Their pitching just isn’t strong enough to carry a bunch of mediocre hitters throughout the grind of a season in the more offense-centered American League.

If I were the Red Sox, I would tell Sandoval that I expect him to drop 25 pounds by opening day. That gives him around six weeks, which is plenty of time for a professional athlete to drop weight. They have the best equipment and trainers that money can buy.

Boston made a big commitment to Sandoval. It’s time for him to return the favor and show that he’s committed as well.

3 Responses to “The Weighting Game”

  1. SportsmanMike Says:

    Some players only play for the money. Pablo has his check and his rings. Is he the type of guy to coast? I think so.

  2. Dan The #1 Rays Fan Says:

    Hey Mike, thanks for checking in.

    I tend to agree with you here. Sandoval has money, a secure contract for the next five years, and three World Championships. I hope he can find some motivation somewhere, or he just might make Red Sox fans yearn for the days of Carl Crawford.

    24 days

  3. Dan The #1 Rays Fan Says:

    Real shame about Chris Sale. Hope he’s ready for opening day. That could change the fantasy draft if he’s not.

Leave a Reply